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November 01, 2009

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Thanks for this insightful post! I've been very, very, very slowly learning more about this general type of dance, and wondering how many of the dances they do in "the movies" are accurate to the period and how many were not. I had no idea Playford was that old/out of style by Austen's time. Cool beans!

Susan, I'm so glad you finally got all of this together in one place. It is a truly excellent reference and I will be forwarding it out to my dance friends and I'm sure referring back to it frequently. You might consider submitting it for publication in the JASNA journal, or perhaps even Persuasions, the journal of the UK Jane Austen Society.

Or to the Jane Austen Centre magazine, Jane Austen's Regency World.
http://www.janeausten.co.uk/regencyworld/index.ihtml
Thanks for this, Susan!

This was such an interesting, informative post! Thank you for gathering and sharing the info! :)

Thank you. I am working choreography for a stage production of Pride and Prejudice. This has been very helpful.

Gaynelle Gosselin
Palm Beach Atlantic University

This may be a few years late ... but thankyou!!

You have proven that American country dance/social dance (or whatever) people can have a sensible and informed view of the realities of the past.

I knew it must be true, though I have been disheartened by the times I have been lectured by ignorant "knowalls" about how English Country dance was always walked etc (in the regency) alongside of demonstrations of dances straight from Playford.

Then to be informed that this is how they *must* be performed (where did social dancing go?), with a stately walk, nose in the air and a metaphorical crick in the little finger.

It speaks more of the prejudices and about a "genteel" past than what real people did who found their pleasures in dancing.

So, as I say, thankyou :-)

ecadre:

You're welcome. :) Appreciation is never late.

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