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October 23, 2008

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Very interesting and very good!
I never seen the "Contre Danses à Paris". Where did You find it?

Another interesting sequences for Balancez is possible to find in Gourdoux-Daux's Elements and principles of the art of dancing

Yes, there are other sequences in Goudoux-Daux (which has at least two of different editions in French plus the English translation of one of them, which differs in places from the original French) as well as others in Strathy, Contre Danses à Paris, and other sources. I was just making a list of ones that met my specific criteria for very easy to dance; it's very far from exhaustive.

Contre Danses à Paris is in one of the research libraries in Scotland; I have both a facsimile, with the rather difficult handwriting, and a transcription prepared by the late Patri Pugliese.

There are two more very easy sequences from Goudoux-Daux's book:

Jeté left before, Glissade before to the right; Jeté right before; Jeté left before.
& reverse (but instead of last Jeté - Assemblé)
(4 bars)

Glissade behind to the right; Assemblé right behind; Glissade before to the right ; Assemblé left behind.
(2 bars for little ballances, for example, in Chassé-Croisé; or twice - 4 bars for long ballancez).


Thank You very much for interesting post.

I considered the first of those but dropped it from the list because it isn't symmetrical. And I wasn't dealing with two-bar sequences at all. Both the technical theory behind asymmetrical sequences and the range of two-bar setting sequences are other topics I'll get to at some future point, along with eight bar sequences. I try to keep individual posts relatively manageable in size and scope, and all three of those topics deserve individual attention.

I considered the first of those but dropped it from the list because it isn't symmetrical.

Why it is not symmetrical? We can do an Assemblé instead of last Jeté in first half.

I try to keep individual posts relatively manageable in size and scope, and all three of those topics deserve individual attention.

OK. I understand.

Today we danced all of this eight variants on the lesson. These is really easy and interesting sequences.

Doing an assemblé on one half and a jeté on the other half makes it not symmetrical. Only sequences where both halves are the same are symmetrical.

I'm glad you enjoyed dancing all these sequences; I'll try to post some more soon.

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