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February 19, 2008

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I do love these branles. Thanks for the post. Now I'll have the tune stuck in my head all day, though. Grr...

Yikes. Jumping and swiishing legs as fast as possible. Definitely for the energetic!

Since the only thing that sets these branles apart from the others in Orchesography is that pied croisé kick, I wonder if that is what made them "Scottish". I wonder if that kick, so prominent in later Scottish dancing, was already a feature of Scottish regional style, so much so that a Frenchman would use it to pantomime dancing like a Scotsman.

Urraca: Could be that, or could be that it was the French conception of what "Scottish" was. I'd be reluctant to make any definite statement about Scottish dance of the era in the absence of direct evidence. The 19th-century Scottische and Ecossoise don't appear to have had any particular connection to Scotland at all.

The pied croisé is in some of Arbeau's galliard variations as well, for whatever that's worth.

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